Abandoning the airless stupefying atmosphere of the boardroom, David Philpott joined a group of young people that took their deliberations to the monkey bars and the rope swing this past weekend, wishing perhaps that all his board meeting could be like this.

BORED MEETINGS & BOARD MEETINGS
You know how it is.  Another board meeting, another stiflingly hot room, another long, long evening with interventions, contradictions, questions, questions, questions and if it’s badly chaired , late-night overruns.
In my long and undistinguished career, I have seen it all – well nearly all – what with all the grandstanding and posing that goes on in the board room, as wannabe chairmen vie for supremacy in a merry dance of show-offery as these  undeclared candidates put themselves forward for the as-yet- unannounced vacancy.  This though is not nearly as stomach-churning as the chair that simply will not go.  Year after year they cling on; the position of chair being the only thing in their shallow lives that gives them any sense of position and status in their own little world.
Stop it David! Enough of your rants.
I may have seen it all in the boardroom, but I have also never had it so good.  I am at that blessed stage in my career when all the boards and chairman/women that I work with are thoroughly decent people who are there to serve for a season, run meetings with one eye on the clock and conduct business with the efficiency of Deutsche Bahn.
However it was not a train I needed – German or otherwise - when on Sunday I was asked to attend a Youth Board Meeting at Grosvenor Hall in Ashford – this the former police training college but now a young people’s activity centre.  A five minute drive from my home and I was passing through the security gates in checking in for a bust day of interaction with this – a board like no other I have ever served on.  This is CXK Ltd, a charity which I am privileged to chair myself and one that makes sure that the voice of its service users – the young people of Kent - is heard by not only having a Youth Board but also by having teenagers represented on the full board.
No stuffy or stifling rooms to suck the life out of you on this hot, hot, hot Sunday then  as we built relationships through team work exercises, scrambling over tyres, hanging from monkey bars, dashing over or under obstacles and building our very own towers of babel with milk crates in the blistering September sun.
As I drove home for a family barbeque – the last of the summer I expect – I could not help but be depressed at the legacy that my generation has left young people such as these I had spent my day with.  One in five is out of work, the property ladder has no affordable first, second or third rungs and all the opportunities that were spread before me at their age have been yanked away like a magic carpet by profligate bankers and careless politicians who took their eye off the ball. 
Notwithstanding this tragedy – the design of which was made in city stuffy boardrooms – instead of investing in their futures, Kent County Council’s reaction has been to cut the funding of this charity by a third. Now that to me seems like a pretty short sighted policy for a public body that is sitting on millions of pounds of reserves and I suspect that the Youth Board will agree wit

BORED MEETINGS & BOARD MEETINGS

You know how it is.  Another board meeting, another stiflingly hot room, another long, long evening with interventions, contradictions, questions, questions, questions and if it’s badly chaired , late-night overruns.

In my long and undistinguished career, I have seen it all – well nearly all – what with all the grandstanding and posing that goes on in the board room, as wannabe chairmen vie for supremacy in a merry dance of show-offery as these  undeclared candidates put themselves forward for the as-yet- unannounced vacancy.  This though is not nearly as stomach-churning as the chair that simply will not go.  Year after year they cling on; the position of chair being the only thing in their shallow lives that gives them any sense of position and status in their own little world.

Stop it David! Enough of your rants.

I may have seen it all in the boardroom, but I have also never had it so good.  I am at that blessed stage in my career when all the boards and chairman/women that I work with are thoroughly decent people who are there to serve for a season, run meetings with one eye on the clock and conduct business with the efficiency of Deutsche Bahn.

However it was not a train I needed – German or otherwise - when on Sunday I was asked to attend a Youth Board Meeting at Grosvenor Hall in Ashford – this the former police training college but now a young people’s activity centre.  A five minute drive from my home and I was passing through the security gates in checking in for a busy day of interaction with this – a board like no other I have ever served on.  This is CXK Ltd, a charity which I am privileged to chair myself and one that makes sure that the voice of its service users – the young people of Kent - is heard by not only having a Youth Board but also by having teenagers represented on the full board.

No stuffy or stifling rooms to suck the life out of you on this hot, hot, hot Sunday then  as we built relationships through team work exercises, scrambling over tyres, hanging from monkey bars, dashing over or under obstacles and building our very own towers of babel with milk crates in the blistering September sun.

As I drove home for a family barbeque – the last of the summer I expect – I could not help but be depressed at the legacy that my generation has left young people such as these I had spent my day with. One in five is out of work, the property ladder has no affordable first, second or third rungs and all the opportunities that were spread before me at their age have been yanked away like a magic carpet by profligate bankers and careless politicians who took their eye off the ball. 

Notwithstanding this tragedy – the design of which was made by "suits"in stuffy City boardrooms – instead of investing in their futures, municipal reaction has been to cut the funding of this charity by a third.

Now that to me seems like a pretty daft short sighted policy; I suspect that the Youth Board might describe that as real monkley business!